What Would You Say to All Longtime/New Bloggers?

What Would You Say to All Longtime/New Bloggers?

Dear Longtime Bloggers:

We get it. You've been here a long time. You created the Internet. Everything we're just discovering now is... yawn... boring and soooooooooooooo 2008. Fretting about commenting etiquette, asking if it's okay to link to a post, questioning how you know when it's the right time to move to self-hosting: we know all of that makes you roll your eyes at us.

But it cuts both ways. We feel like our blog will never take off. If you weren't blogging back in 2006, there's just no chance to hit it big these days. There's too much noise on the Internet, and how is someone supposed to find and love a new, little blog?

We look up to you because you've been around a long time. You can always chime in with some bit of blogosphere history, giving context to things that seem confusing to a new blogger. Like why do some people have partial rss feeds for their blog? And why do some people use CAPTCHA even when they know that it makes commenting from a phone difficult?

Really, all we want is to meet on a level playing field and talk, blogger-to-blogger.

Sincerely,

New Bloggers

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Image: Glenn Strong via Flickr

Dear New Bloggers:

We're jealous because you have all the excitement in finding the Internet that we felt back when we started our blogs. We remember staying up late, anxious for comments to pour in for the post we just published. We remember the elation of seeing someone link to our blog for the first time. We remember meeting our first blogger.

And, we have to admit, we're always looking to recapture that energy. Sure, it's nice to know where things stand, trafficwise, or how to tweak our blog's template. But sometimes we can feel a little bit like a hamster on a wheel, running through blog posts and feeling as if our blog isn't going anywhere anymore. We miss feeling as if anything were possible, and sometimes we wonder if we're suffering from a lack of creativity when we see your mind-blowing DIY projects or recipes.

Listen, you can be a little annoying when you ask us for favours without doing the hard work of building a relationship. The best way to get a bigger blogger to link to a smaller blog is to become friendly by commenting or emailing for a bit. Interact with us on Twitter and then ask us to throw you some traffic. We usually will since we once had a new blog like you, and we remember how hard it is to grow a blog.

Anyway, we really do like your blogs even if we sometimes forget to leave the well-worn paths that we've formed with other longtime bloggers.

Sincerely,

Longtime Bloggers

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Dear Longtime Bloggers:

We could always... you know... hang out at the BlogHer conference this summer. Maybe you could teach us how to migrate our blogs from free Wordpress to a self-hosted account?

Sincerely,

New Bloggers

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Dear New Bloggers:

Yeah, that sounds good. Maybe some of your energy will rub off on us, and we can go home from the conference feeling recharged and ready to tackle the blogoshere.

Sincerely,

Longtime Bloggers

If you're a new blogger, what would you want to tell the longtime bloggers? If you've been around the blogosphere for a while, what would you want to tell all the newbies? Write a blog post and then use the linky feature below to add your letter to the conversation?

Melissa writes Stirrup Queens and Lost and Found. Her novel about blogging is Life from Scratch.

Recent Posts by Melissa Ford

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