Uniting my MILFs: A Memorable Girls Night Out

Uniting my MILFs: A Memorable Girls Night Out

There’s something special about mommyfriends. I’ve blogged before about my group of mommypals, you may remember, we call ourselves the MILFs.

My MILFs

Well we’ve known each other for roughly four years and early on, we were pretty tight, even had a girls weekend in Wisconsin. But over time, with changing jobs, growing families, ailing elders, swim lessons, soccer games, T-ball and ballet, we’d gotten lost in the demands of our lives.

Trying to get a Girls Night Out going seemed like a fruitless effort as out of the eight of us, only one or two could make it. That would result in disappointment all around.

I would still regularly talk, text, email and Facebook with most of the MILFs and a few girls continued to hang out with each other, but it’s been a long time since it was all eight. And every time I talked to a MILF they would say how they desperately needed a night out.

I agreed, but didn’t want to have just a regular night of drinking, I wanted to do something special.

We needed to do something to celebrate our friendship, because I’ve been to a few other mommy groups and they are nowhere near as awesome as my MILFs. They’ve got one too many “Mombots.” (Robot-like mommies with zero personality.)

I picked a special spot to host us, Tuscan Market and Wine Shop. I love wine and I love food and this place is teeming with both. Plus it’s cozy, unpretentious and a great place to hang with friends.

Next, I scheduled it so all eight could come. I tried to take away any excuse to miss out and I tried to build up a little mystique by saying I had planned “something special.”

See, the problem with some of our GNOs is that we often spend much of the time talking about our kids. While yes, we all want to know what the others’ munchkins are up to, whether we’re going through the same struggles, yaddayaddayadda. However, after a bit of that, it’s time to move on to other topics. We are more than our children. This is our time away from our kids, this is our time, so let’s talk about us!

As much as I hate playing stupid games, I figured I’d Google for some clever ones that would give each other more non-kid related insight to ourselves or at least make us laugh.

This game-playing thing is not my comfort area, so I reached out to one of the MILFs, who’s done these touchy-feely team-building things for her job. I also thought it’d be great to use some of the swag I’d gotten at recent blogging events as giveaways to the game winners.

It was a Wednesday night and me and a MILF arrived a smidge early. I needed to set the table up with the goodie bags of chocolate I’d made. The first game was that we had to write on a piece of paper something no one at the table knew. That resulted in stories that ranged from the hilarious: the police caught one MILF literally with her pants down schtooping her then-boyfriend (now husband) in a parking lot. Others were more serious, like being a scared high schooler who skipped school one day to drive her friend to the abortion clinic.

We did another game, that was a fill-in-the-blank type thing and then came my favorite part. The Paper Plate Awards.

I’m not crafty so don’t judge on the quality, but I created these awards for each MILF. Before handing them out, I briefly told each girl why she’s special to me. Toward the end, I found myself getting unnaturally verklempt and a couple of them were blinking back tears too.

I didn’t mean to slip into the Land of Sap, but alas there I was. I made it through without crying and we finished out the rest of the evening catching up on each others lives, (kids and all) and devouring insanely scrumptious appetizers and pizzas.

I’m working on the MILF night for next month, but I’ve told the girls not to expect anything special, I simply felt we needed to breathe a little life into our amazing friendships and remind ourselves how lucky we are to have one another.

 

*Photos by Ginny Washburne.

Related Posts

Does the Internet Make Women More Honest About Their Friendships?

I have 574 friends on Facebook. I chalk this up to the fact that (1) I've lived in a bunch of places and (2) I have a good track record for keeping friends. Most people on my friend list have been close friends at one time, and Facebook has allowed us to keep in touch without a lot of effort. It leaves the door open so I can jump back into those friendships (and often do) at any point. But in this day and age, "friending" has taken on an entirely different meaning. There are people looking to build friendships with me online, people I've never met who have never even e-mailed with me. They send a friend request without even letting me know who they are. Which sort of begs the question: What does friendship mean in the Internet age?   Read more >

Making Mom-on-Non-Mom Friendship Work

Dear Child-free ladies: So you’ve decided children are not for you. In fact, shows like “Nanny 911” and “Supernanny” make you want to retire those fallopian tubes indefinitely. But even as you laugh cynically at stories of “mombies” and “helicopter parents,” your good friend just had a baby. She may be exhausted and full of enthusiasm for her Diaper Genie, but she has also never, ever shamed you or pressured you to follow her lead. In fact, the same smug jerks who tell you that you’ll never be self-actualized unless you breed are the ones confronting her in the market for daring to buy 2-percent milk (Children need full milk, you know. And it better be organic!). You owe it to her to support her choice and try to get to know her kids. Most of all, you have to realize she is now a package deal. Spouses may come and go, but parenthood is forever.   Read more >

Do Tell: Share Why You Need a Date Night to Win a $250 Dinner for Two

Tell why you need a date night out -- whether it's with your partner, your kid, your bestie or someone brand-new to your life. If you win, dinner's on BlogHer -- up to $250 worth at a restaurant of your choice near you.   Read more >

Comments

In order to comment on BlogHer.com, you'll need to be logged in. You'll be given the option to log in or create an account when you publish your comment. If you do not log in or create an account, your comment will not be displayed.