The transfer.

The transfer.

I wasn't there.

Her babe was transferred.

I wasn't there.

Her babe was taken to another hospital.

She cried and cried.

She wanted to go too.

She didn't want to be separated.

They said, 'No'.

There were no beds.

It was devastating.

Seventy-two hours passed, 

Before she was able to see her baby.

I watched as the nurses,

Gently placed her baby,

In her arms.

Manipulating the wires and tubes,

Around her loving arms.

She wept.

She cooed.

Overwhelmed with joy and grief,

She silently sobbed,

When it was time to leave.

Her babe , unable to suckle,

So she pumped her breasts,

And fed her,

Through a tube.

She learned to care for her babe.

Competently,

She became a nurse Mom.

Her babe stabilized, 

And graduated from the ICU,

Into a regular ward.

We celebrated.

There was hope in her voice, 

And life in her eyes.

Hospital visiting rules changed

On this new floor.

Parents and Grandparents only.

I was no longer allowed to see her.

I had been with her every day 

Her Mom was not able.

Every other day,

Even when she was there.

She knew I was sad.

She knew I loved her baby.

She knew she may not live. 

She saved me.

She requested a policy change.

She said she needed me.  

She gifted me.

Annointed me with a generousity,

Only she possesses.

By allowing me to be a part of those first days.

Time was precious,

And she shared it with me.  

 

 

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