Gluten-Free Pizza Dough: Easier Than You Think

Gluten-Free Pizza Dough: Easier Than You Think

It’s the go-to party food, the something-went-wrong-with-dinner salvation meal and one of the most requested gluten-free recipes of all time.

While there are gluten-free frozen pizzas, premade crusts and box mixes on the market, I’m all for homemade. In fact, in my pre-GF life, homemade pizza made a regular appearance at our house. We’d make two huge pies, meat eaters designed one, veg heads took control of the other, and we’d just go to town with the toppings…fun!

I’m not changing what I eat, just the recipes!

 

gluten-free pizza

Then, like many of you, I learned a gluten-free lifestyle was in order. But a celiac diagnosis didn’t mean my family routine needed to change, it simply meant a family recipe would be refashioned. Besides, most pre-made products and mixes contain gums, which I try to avoid in my baking (not to mention some contain soy, dairy or other allergens).

So, I simply took the go-to pizza crust recipe I had used for years and tweaked it to make it gluten-free. The results were pretty tasty! I tried other recipes over the years, but kept returning to my tried-and-true crust.

Last September, I finally shared the recipe in Food Solutions Magazine. That version, which I recommended be spread onto a parchment-lined pizza pan (versus rolling out), received so many positive reviews from readers!

 

gluten-free pizza

 

But, as it goes with recipe developers, there always exists the curiosity… What if I did this? Wonder what would happen if I used this instead of that?

I am not immune to those internal queries, nor is my pizza crust.

A confession about weight.

I’ve been baking by weight for some time now. (I know, I’m still sharing volume measures here on the site, but am working on a guide to weight versus volume measurement for gluten-free flours for you and promise to share soon.) I tweaked the recipe yet again for weight measurement. The result was an even better crust. I was satisfied and resolved to tweak no more.

Then, just when my crust curiosity abated, I received a gift package from King Arthur Flour containing several of their gluten-free products. I’ve tried their products in the past, and I’ve even shared with you that I believe their brown rice flour is by far the most superior I’ve ever used.

(Just a note: I’m not trying to sell King Arthur products, they aren’t paying me to tell you this – they have no idea I’m writing this post – and the gift of products from them was for an unrelated project.)

I couldn’t resist…just one more tweak.

Since King Arthur’s Gluten-Free Multipurpose Flour is free from gums, corn, soy, dairy and nuts (much like my Everyday Gluten-Free Flour Blend), I had to give it a whirl in my pizza crust recipe.

Let me cut to the chase…

 

gluten-free pizza

 

In about half an hour, you can have piping-hot pizza from your oven, made from gorgeous, perfectly kneadable dough (although there’s no need to knead for this recipe!) that will bring a tear of joy to your eye if you’ve missed real pizza since going gluten-free.

I could not keep this from you. You deserve it. Make it. Enjoy it. Repeat. (See substitution notes and other recipe info in body of ingredients and below recipe in my Notes section.)

Quick and Simple Gluten-Free Pizza Dough

 

gluten-free pizza

 

Use this recipe to create one large pizza, or divide dough into four equal portions for individual pizzas, like the one pictured up top. I love making personal pizzas in a small cast-iron skillet! You can also divide the dough and use it to make calzones and even as flatbread, if you like.

Grab the recipe here and enjoy: Quick & Simple Gluten-Free Pizza Dough

 
gluten-free pizza

 

Buon appetito!

xo

Gigi ;)

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