Must-Follow Monday: Asian-Pacific American Blogs

Must-Follow Monday: Asian-Pacific American Blogs

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month. In honor of the occasion, we're sharing some blogs written by Asian American and Pacific Islander women who are influencing social media and leading discussions. Please check out our list—and add some of your favorites in the comments!

MFM badge


HEY MONA

Mona Conception, the blogger behind Hey Mona, is not only hilarious—she is also the only female Chamorro comedian in the United States (or maybe the world). If you can’t catch one of her standup shows in the Seattle area, the next best thing would be to follow her online.


AISHA SAEED

Aisha is one of the driving forces behind the #WeNeedDiverseBooks Twitter campaign, and she’s also just sold her debut YA novel, Written in the Stars. Her blog frequently focuses on her family and her Muslim faith.


REAPPROPRIATE

Jenn Fang has been blogging at Reappropriate since 2001. Yes, 2001. For over 13 years, she’s been writing about Asian American feminism, pop culture, and activism.


MORE THAN SERVING TEA

At More Than Serving Tea, Kathy Khang writes about the intersection of Asian American female identity and the Christian faith. Kathy was one of the bloggers who called attention to Pastor Rick Warren’s use of Communist Red Guard imagery last summer. She’s also one of the authors of the book More Than Serving Tea.


I'M NOT THE NANNY

The blog name I’m Not the Nanny came out of Thien-Kim Lam's experience being asked if she's the nanny of her Vietnamese-black biracial kids. In 2013, Thien-Kim was one of BlogHer’s Voices of the Year.

Of course, this isn't a complete list, so feel free to share some of your favorite Asian American and Pacific Islander blogs in the comments below.

News and Politics Editor Grace Hwang Lynch blogs about raising an Asian mixed-race family at HapaMama.

Related Posts

Comments

In order to comment on BlogHer.com, you'll need to be logged in. You'll be given the option to log in or create an account when you publish your comment. If you do not log in or create an account, your comment will not be displayed.