The life of cancer.

The life of cancer.

Despite the chemotherapy and my superhero,

Mom’s cancer metastasized to her liver and lung.

 

Two more surgeries were required.

We took time from our jobs.

We took time from our families.

We took time to be there for Mom.

 

We stayed at a nurses’ residence.

We stayed at a Nunnery. 

We wanted to be close.

Mom was forever thankful.

The family at large was forever thankful too.

We became known as ‘the nurses.’

 

We became institutionalized.

We spent so much time in hospital.

Characteristically,

we found things to amuse ourselves. 

 

We made friendships in waiting rooms.

We made friendships at our flats.

 

We brought food. 

We ate what we had. 

When you are hungry...

It is all good.

Even sardines. 

 

We would be hysterical with exhaustion at the end of each day.

We would recall the stories we overheard.

We would relive the rainstorm we walked in.

We would think up another meal from our ‘pantry’.

 

Chemotherapy would be reinstated immediately after surgery.

Mom never got a break from it.

She carried around a bag full of medications.

For any side effect she suffered from,

There was a medication to counter act it.

 

‘Cancer sucked’.  That’s a quote. 

 

Meanwhile, she continued to live.

 

She cared for my son when I went back to work.

She cooked meals.

Cleaned house.

Wrote letters to her Mom.

Made phone calls to her sister.

 

She made family dinners.

She hosted Christmas.

She laughed. 

She laughed.

 

Mom's favourite place was her trailer.

She felt safe there. 

People let her alone there. 

It became her sanctuary.

 

We had many family gatherings there.

We all knew how much it meant to Mom.

The children loved it too. 

 

We supported each other with our togetherness.

We were family extraordinaire.

We loved our leader.

We needed our nucleus.

She was pivotal to our existence. 

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