Celebrating #BlogHer13 #MultiCulti Party – Multi Culti Family & Adopted Culture

Celebrating #BlogHer13 #MultiCulti Party – Multi Culti Family & Adopted Culture

This month, Digital Sisterhood Network founder Ananda Leeke is preparing to co-host the BlogHer 13 Multi Culti Party on July 26 with “digital sister” bloggers Pauline Campos of Aspiring Mama blog and Dwana De La Cerna of House on A Hill blog in Chicago, Illinois. Click here to check out the BlogHer Loves Multi Culti Pinterest board. Over the next three weeks, Ananda will be sharing several multi culti-inspired blog posts that invite your feedback. Today’s blog post focuses on her multi culti family and adopted culture. My Multi Culti Family My African American family’s roots represent a mélange of West African, Native American, Canadian, and European cultures. The historical data from the American slave trade has helped my family conclude that our African ancestors who were brought to North Carolina and Virginia came from West African countries. Knowing this to be our only factual tie, I traveled to the slave castles on Goree Island in Senegal in 1994 and Cape Coast, Ghana in 1997 and 2003, to honor the spirits of our African ancestors. Based on family records, research, and stories, I know I am the great-great-great granddaughter of Hence Daniel, a Native American man who married Ann Daniel, a former enslaved African woman who lived to be 113 years old in Kentucky. I am the great-great granddaughter of Ida Goens Bolden, a woman with African, Native American, and Portuguese blood running through her veins. In addition, I am the great granddaughter of James Ebert Leak, a French Canadian man born in Winnipeg, Canada. My grandfather John Leonard Leeke told me his father James Ebert Leak also had Irish blood running through his veins. As you can see, my family like many American families is a melting pot of people from all over the globe. What cultures are in your family’s melting pot? Share your responses in the comment section below.

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