Buying Toddlers Shoes - 3 Tips To Make It Slightly Easier Than Brain Surgery

Buying Toddlers Shoes - 3 Tips To Make It Slightly Easier Than Brain Surgery

Lets talk about my kids' feet.  The Girl is 3 and has a smallish foot (size 6), but nothing crazy.  The Boy is 2 and a half and has a doughy foot with a layer of protective blubber on top.  I understand that baby feet are chubby, but by now, shouldn't that hoof  have slimmed down a little and started taking on its human form?  Don't ask me how this happened.  Physically, my husband is an elf and I am a gnome.  We wear thimbles for shoes, so how we gave birth to someone with hobbit feet is beyond me.

After months of struggle to find a shoe that fit him when he first starting walking (around 15 months), I finally caved and went to Stride Rite.  As most of you know, Stride Rite is like Christian Louboutin for kid piggies -- indulgent, overpriced and unnecessary.  It didn't matter, I was desperate!   I had purchased all sizes and types of shoes from Target and Kohl's only to find myself unable to get the shoes on the feet without shoe horns and various cooking oils.  In the rare instance that I could get a shoe on, he would fall every third step and fuss until I took them off.  Toddler shoes are not just a plague for my son, my daughter suffers from a disorder whereby she finds walking in 90% of shoes to be a task equal in concentration to unicycling across the rocky surface of Mars during an earthquake (or would it be a Marsquake?).

Back to Stride Rite.  I figured that any place with those metal foot measuring slider devices would be able to hook me up even if it was at a price.  I pried off whatever foot covering I had wedged onto him that day so they could measure him and I shared my trials in shoe shopping with the clerk (do we still say clerk or is it pediprofessional or something?).  At the risk of sounding like my grandmother, the 'clerk'  went in the back to get an extra wide.  Sweet!  Who knew there was such a thing!?  I may have heard about wide shoes for adults in passing (my perfectly shaped feet will be a topic for another blog, but they are awesome and don't require to me to dabble in 'special' sizes), but I had never even thought about it for toddlers.  She brought out the XW.  $50+ later, I left with a fresh pair of extra wide toddler sneakers.  The pediprofessional said 'These should fit him for at least another 2-3 months'.

IMG_1740
Boy's hamshank tootsies

Somehow, once the shoes left the safety of the store and were exposed to the stale mall air, they shrunk 3 sizes.  Within a week his meat loafs had expended to a width that dared the velcro to even catch.  After some online sleuthing with my new keyword 'wide', I found out that Stride Rite carries an XXW - that clerk had been holding out on me!  If you look at toddler boy XXWs on the Stride Rite site, there are 2 styles that I will call Nurse Shoes and Basket Sandals.  My husband would confiscate Nurse Shoes immediately if spotted on Boy, and since Basket Shoes had holes for the fankle (like a cankle only in the foot area) to seep through and would inevitably cause waffle-foot, those were out too.

If you have struggled with buying shoes for your toddler, I have a few basic tips to share:

1.  Think Cheap - Don't be lured into expensive kids shoe stores. After all of my struggles with the Boy, the shoe we finally found to fit was a Healthtex Classic Wide Width shoe for under $13 at Walmart!  Ding ding ding! Unfortunately he is in the largest size now, so short of some Chinese foot binding, we are going to have to resume our searching.

The Healthtex shoes that finally worked for him - sure I had to observe 2 visible thongs and a domestic disturbance while in Walmart to purchase these, but it was worth it!
The Healthtex shoes that finally worked for him - sure I had to observe 2 visible thongs and a domestic disturbance while in Walmart to purchase these, but it was worth it!

2.  Trace Their Foot - If you can get them to stand still long enough, trace their foot on a piece of paper and you can either 1) take it shopping with you and compare to the bottom of shoes you think will work to figure out what size they need.  Note:  the paper foot is typically much better behaved than the real foot, which typically kicks and comes with a high pitched whine in my house. OR  2) Measure the traced foot and order the shoes online accordingly.  There is a good inches to shoe size conversion list here.

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