Of Asking, Risks and Rewards

Of Asking, Risks and Rewards

You guys!

OMG

So much happened yesterday, like many muches of things.

Well, not really...it was just one thing. But a bigish, ginormous thing for me!

When I wrote about my big idea to have FORD loan me a hybrid car to drive from California to Chicago so that I could attend BlogHer'13, while promoting their product...OF COURSE, I never expected in many millions of years a representative would actually leave a comment.

Little old me, in my mouse hole corner of the blogosphere, was noticed by an entity that makes stuff happen! I'm still a bit "wow" over it all.

I wasn't asking with any real seriousness, I was just having fun with my post. But, if I'm to be completely honest, I wasn't entirely not serious. I know, it's a little muddled - you should be used to me by now.

I copied FORD when I tweeted the link to my blog post. So, I WAS putting myself out there with a tiny grain of hope that it would be seen. It never occurred to me that it actually WOULD be noticed. I realize that sounds strange, but it is a bit like buying a lottery ticket - you know the chances of winning are pretty much nil, but you spend that dollar anyway with the hope that just maybe.

Receiving a comment from someone that represents FORD and having them offer to let me pitch my idea reminded me of a TED talk a friend of mine posted on my Facebook wall recently (thank you, A.), because she was feeding my girl crush on Amanda Palmer

 Watch it and swoon as I did. Go ahead...I'll wait...

 

 

 Do y'all see the NaBloPoMo theme of 'risk' in her talk? 

To ask is to risk. To trust is to risk. 

It would be infinitely easier to thank the wonderful person from FORD and then dismiss it. There is no risk in that, it's completely safe. But, what is it safe from? The word "no"? It's not like they are going to yell at me and call me an idiot for wasting their time on such a ridiculous idea.

The worst that will happen is they'll say, "No, thank you."

I also can't ignore the enthusiastic and positive comments, both public and private, from friends and fellow bloggers, encouraging me to do it and to write that pitch in my voice - to just be me. I thought, "Really, y'all can't be serious about this...have you NOT read my posts? How could I possibly approach a giant professional company like that as...well...me?"

Again...the video...and Amanda...and asking and risk and...and...why not?

Every opportunity we take to put ourselves out there, stepping from behind the barbed wire boundary walls of our comfort zone is a reward wrapped in risk. Sure, we may be shot down - "We aren't interested" can cut and hurt. But the fear of hearing those words should never outweigh the thrill of being given the opportunity to ask. Someone saw me, I'm not invisible(remember Amanda mentioning that in her speech?), and wants to hear more from me. That counts for much, does it not?

I've rarely shied away from risks, but 'asking' is something that has always been hard for me. Just ask all those friends who offered to do stuff for me when I was recovering from my thyroid cancer surgery. "No, that's not necessary, I'll be fine" was my frequent response.

There are often great rewards from risk and then again, sometimes there isn't and all you have is the experience. I realize the infinitesimally small chance of this idea coming to fruition, but I'm also still buying lottery tickets...so...what the hell, right?

Besides, I'm no stranger to being on the receiving end of "NO!"...I do have teenagers after all.

Stay tuned for more BlogHer'13 or Bust updates!

 

In honor of NaBloPoMo in November, BlogHer is launching BlogHer PRO School, a month-long course of concrete ways to improve your writing and focus your blog. And don't miss your chance to build on your NaBlo inspiration at BlogHer PRO on December 3-4: Two intensive, hands-on days of workshops and opportunities that help you take your blog or business to the next level. REGISTER NOW!

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